Tuesday, 28 March 2017

New study shows we’re going to live a lot longer

A new study shows that Irish men and women can now expect to live well into their eighties. The research, carried out by scientists from the Imperial College London in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO) published their findings in the Lancet today. Irish men born in 2030 will live to an average 84 years old, putting them in eighth place out of 35 countries. Irish women born that year will live to about 87 years, 14th in the age rankings. In comparison, life expectancy for women in 2010 was of 82.5 years, and 77.9 years for men. The analysis shows that a baby girl born in South Korea in 2030 will have an expected lifespan of 90.8 years. Her baby boy counterpart born in that year will likely live to 84.1 years of age. Other advanced countries like the US also lag behind with an average for women of 83.3 years and men 79.5, the numbers held back by high child and maternal death rates, homicide and obesity. Professor Majid Ezzati, of Imperial College London, put the increase down to improvements in healthcare services and medical advancements. “As recently as the turn of the century, many researchers believed that life expectancy would never surpass 90 years. Our predictions of increasing lifespans highlight our public health and healthcare successes.” Rsearchers also highlight the need for careful planning for health and social services and pensions in order to cope with the ageing population.

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