Monday, 14 October 2019

Miya Folick started band on Tinder

(Photo by Samantha Saturday)

LOS ANGELES: People go onto Tinder looking for lots of things – but a musical career isn’t normally one of them.

But that’s exactly what LA songwriter Miya Folick did, tapping up the dating app to find herself a band. And it worked.

“You can make a profile on TInder and have it say whatever you want,” says the singer.

“I realised that most people in LA were on Tinder and, of those people, many were probably musicians – so I just made a profile that said ‘looking for a band’ and put my Instagram handle on it. My bass player Brian reached out to me, and that was that.”

That was three years ago, since when Folick and her band have roamed the paths of California folk-rock, spiky punk-pop and self-excavating electronic balladry.

In fact, the songs on her debut album, Premonitions, often sound like they could have come from different albums, even different artists.

Tying it all together are the 28-year-old’s otherworldly vocals, which soar and dive like a jumper in a tumble dryer, only more tuneful.

She phoned the BBC from her tour bus to talk about her unique sound; the accuracy of her Wikipedia page; and how one of her songs was inspired by Black Panther star Lupita Nyong’o.

I’m interested in why Premonitions has so many moods and textures. Usually, a debut album sticks to one genre to establish the artist in the public’s consciousness. I know what you’re saying and that’s definitely something I was fearful of at first. It’s easier to have one sound that people can digest easily – like a calling card or a very specific aesthetic, but that’s not what I was interested in making.

I was obsessed with the idea of making an album like Bjork’s Post which is really eclectic and creates a dynamic and interesting world.

With streaming, people are increasingly listening to individual tracks and playlists – so maybe diversity isn’t the problem it used to be. Your album has something for everyone.

Right. It’s interesting because people allow for that diversity in certain genres of music but not in others. I’m from the indie world, where people expect you to have a very specific sound. But then I look at artists like Rihanna. Anti was not a homogenous album at all, but nobody bats an eyelid.

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